Economy

CBO regularly assesses the state of the economy and prepares economic projections that underlie the agency’s projections for the federal budget and cost estimates for proposed legislation. CBO also produces studies on specific economic issues, such as trends in productivity and the condition of labor markets, and examines the economic impact of significant proposed changes in federal spending programs and the federal tax system.

  • Report August 25, 2015

    CBO expects that the deficit this year will be $426 billion––$60 billion less than projected in March. The economy is expected to expand modestly this year, at a solid pace in 2016 and 2017, and at a more moderate pace in subsequent years.  

  • Report August 25, 2015

    CBO projects that if the debt limit is unchanged, the measures that the Treasury has been taking to avoid breaching that limit will be exhausted sometime between mid-November and early December, and the Treasury will then run out of cash.

  • Report June 16, 2015

    If current laws remained generally unchanged, federal debt held by the public would exceed 100 percent of GDP by 2040 and continue on an upward path relative to the size of the economy—a trend that could not be sustained indefinitely.

  • Report February 20, 2015

    In calendar year 2014, ARRA—which was enacted in 2009—raised real GDP by between a small fraction of a percent and 0.2 percent and increased the number of full-time-equivalent jobs by between a slight amount and 0.2 million, CBO estimates.

  • Report January 26, 2015

    Under current law, the deficit is projected to hold steady as a percentage of GDP through 2018, but rise thereafter, raising the already high federal debt. The rate of economic growth is projected to be solid in 2015 and the next few years.

  • Report February 4, 2014

    Since the recession ended in June 2009, employment has risen sluggishly and the unemployment rate has fallen only partway back to its prerecession level. This CBO report discusses the reasons for the slow recovery of the labor market.

  • Report June 18, 2013

    S. 744 would boost economic output—CBO projects—by 3.3 percent in 2023 and by 5.4 percent in 2033. Employment, investment, and productivity would increase, but average wages would be less than under current law until 2025.

  • Report November 14, 2012

    During the three years following the recession in 2008 and 2009, the economy’s output grew at less than half the rate seen, on average, during other economic recoveries in the United States since the end of World War II.