Sequestration

Sequestration refers to automatic spending cuts that occur through the withdrawal of funding for certain (but not all) government programs. CBO provides estimates of the statutory caps on discretionary funding and an assessment of whether sequestration might be necessary under current budgetary rules, but the Administration's Office of Management and Budget makes the ultimate determination of whether a sequestration is necessary and, if so, how big it should be.

  • Report

    As required, CBO reports on whether appropriations enacted for the current fiscal year have exceeded the statutory caps on discretionary funding. In CBO’s estimation, they have not, and a sequestration will not be required for 2018.

  • Report

    In a report required by law, CBO provides estimates of the caps on discretionary funding for each fiscal year through 2021. CBO concludes that the discretionary appropriations provided to date for 2017 do not exceed the caps for this year.

  • Report

    As required, CBO reports on whether appropriations enacted for the current fiscal year have exceeded the statutory caps on discretionary spending. In CBO’s estimation, they have not, and a sequestration will not be required for 2017.

  • Report

    In a report required by law, CBO provides estimates of the caps on discretionary funding for each fiscal year through 2021. CBO concludes that the discretionary appropriations provided to date for 2016 do not exceed the caps for this year.

  • Report

    CBO is required to report its assessment of whether enacted appropriations for the current fiscal year exceed caps on discretionary spending. In CBO's estimation, they do not, and hence a sequestration will not be required for 2016.